Saturday, November 6, 2010

Fistbump of the Day #9 - The Dunamis Word: 103rd Annual Holy Convocation ~ Great God, Good Lord...Say What???

Elder Harvey Burnett has posted some great reflections on the 103 Holy Convocation of the Church of God in Christ on his blog. I agree with him. There are definitely some problems. I love the Church of God In Christ. I've been a member my whole life. I'm greatly perturbed that people like Sharpton and Jakes are (or might) be allowed to speak during the convocation. They both teach contrary to the doctrines and theology of our church. The problems facing us are not just from Homosexuality and Gay marriage, but also from the Word of Faith false teachers, and not to mention Jakes denies the Trinity. I'm not sure if Sharpton knows what the Trinity is either. We need to pray. We need stand against anything that is against what the Bible teaches. Obeying God and staying with what God has revealed is much important!

The Dunamis Word: 103rd Annual Holy Convocation ~ Great God, Good Lord...Say What???
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25 comments:

  1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  2. So, do you think your sect is the most true version of christianity?

    You say you've been part of your sect for your whole life, it seems unlikely that you lucked into, by birth, the truest form of your religion.

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  3. Um, no. The Church of God in Christ isn't the only true church. No more of less than the Assemblies of God, Lutherans, Methodist, Presbyterian, Anglican, Baptists, and many other denominations. There are true followers of Christ of every race, nation, creed, and denomination. They put their faith into Jesus Christ for Salvation. This is truly one of the dumbest things you have ever commented that I've had the amusement of reading.

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  4. I guess that would lead to a question of why all the churches if they are all different, but true...

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  5. A pretty stupid question without defining what you think is "different". All the churches I mention believe that that Jesus is God. God's nature is Triune, and that we can only be saved through believing that Jesus paid for our sins through his death, burial, and Resurrection. This is what the Gospel is! Pure and simple. Other points may be debated and disagreed one. This is why there are denominations. These other matters don't make you not a Christian. Most of the differences have to do with worship style and procedure not on what the Bible says or its importance. Don't forget Bishop Mason founded your denomination (the one you rejected) just like God used him to found mine.

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  6. John Wesley and George Whitefield founded the sect I spent the most time in. No idea who Bishop Mason is...

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  7. If you were not part of the Assemblies of God then I am mistaken about the remark about C.H. Mason.

    Wesley was an Arminian and Whitefield was a Calvinist. What denomination did they found together?

    Third, if you have not heard of CH Mason then you did not read Elder Burnett's post.

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  8. Why would I have read Harvey's post?

    I was methodist for most of the time I was a christian.

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  9. I don't know if I would classify Whitefield as a Methodist. But ok.

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  10. I don't think it matters if you'd classify him as one of the founders or not.

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  11. Sure it does. By and large John Wesley's theology and ideas are what seems to have influenced the Methodist denomination much more than Whitefield. That's not bad. I admire both men greatly. I think the question is why do you think George Whitefield founded the Methodist church? Clearly Methodists are Christians and I clearly expect to see George Whitefield and John Wesley in heaven. If you don't put your faith in Jesus, you will miss it. (They both would agree with that.)

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  12. Well, you don't seem to know as much about the history of these men as you think you do.

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  13. Translation of Ryan's last comment: I don't want to deal with my sin and the fact that I am going to hell without Jesus Christ so I'm going to ignore what you say and pretend I know more than you do when clearly I don't.

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  14. No, it just seems that you don't know much about the actual history of those two men and appear to think of them more in terms of their theology. I notice that a lot with Christians... "He's a Arminian." or "He's a Calvinist". They miss who the people actually were.

    And for the record, I deal with my sin because I'm the only one who can.

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  15. I didn't say that the two men were at each other's throat or weren't friends. But if you know anything about their theology then you know that the methodist church has followed the Wesley way more closely.

    As for your sin, how do you deal with your sin? How do you know you are clean and that your sins have been paid for. How do you know that when you give an account for your life you have measured up?

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  16. I wasn't talking about the eventual theology, I said "founded by". The history on this really is very accessible...

    Well, there is no "sin", it's simply bad behavior and bad behavior has consequences. If I recognize that I did something bad to someone, I try to make amends. If I recognize something about myself that I'm not proud of, I try to amend my ways and "go forth and sin no more".

    I do believe that many of our religious beliefs regarding sin arose as "wish fulfilment" because it's not always possible to make amends for our "sins", especially in the ancient world when travel and communication were limited and lifespans much shorter than today. The Roman Legionnaire stationed in Dacia may wish to make amends to the women he raped in Carthage, but it's unlikely he'd ever be able to. But hey! Voila, just admit you are sorry to Jesus and all is good! Never mind the woman in Carthage though... Guilt is good and powerful, and it should drive people to be better, but Christianity seems to short circuit that in a way.

    And you really should be aware by now that I don't believe sin is a metaphysical thing that builds up on a person that one needs to be magically "cleaned" of, and that I don't believe one has to give an account to a magic sky judge when they die. Where have you been?

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  17. I know you don't believe you will have to give an account to anyone besides yourself. That's what so sad. You will. And you won't have anything to stand on because you haven't been able to measure up to the standards God has set. No one has or can - without Jesus.

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  18. Have you figured out that you were wrong about George Whitefield and Methodism yet?

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  19. I know you don't believe you will have to give an account to anyone besides yourself.

    And this statement is incorrect, I am accountable to my family and friends and society in general.

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  20. Ryan Anderson said:

    Have you figured out that you were wrong about George Whitefield and Methodism yet?

    What I remember saying is that the Methodist church today reflects the teachings of John Wesley than George Whitefield. If you disagree...then fine. That's not the important part. Both Wesley and Whitefield would tell you that you need Jesus. I'd listen to them if I were you...oh wait...I did.

    And this statement is incorrect, I am accountable to my family and friends and society in general.

    Ryan, you agreed that people seem to get away with all kinds of evil all the time. Family, friends, and society can be fooled. They don't know everything you say, do, or think. How they hold you accountable? OF course you have responsibilities to them, but do you really think that you are accountable? What are consequences for your "bad behavior" (as you call it)? Because they can't hold you accountable for everything you say and do, being accountable to your family and friends and society in general is no real accountability at all in any real sense. So we are back to yourself and what you think is right and wrong.

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  21. You don't have to remember what you said, it's in print! "I don't know if I would classify Whitefield as a Methodist."

    Being accountable to real people is the only real sense of accountability there is. You can pretend you are accountable to an imaginary friend, but you aren't.

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  22. Of course I said that. And I said why I said it. Again disagree all you want but Wesley's viewpoint is the one that is most prevalent in the Methodist Church.

    As for your answer about accountability. You have to prove that God does not exist in order to assume you have no accountability to them. And you still have to admit that "real" people that you know are unable to perfectly hold you accountable.

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  23. Actually, the nonexistance of god is the default position. I in no way have to prove it doesn't exist, not anymore than I have to prove Santa or Goblins don't exist.

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  24. Of course I admit that it's not possible to be held perfectly accountable.

    You have to admit that nothing is perfect so you have no reason to posit that anything perfect actually exists.

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